Clinical Tests on the Diagnostics of Tenovaginitis of the Long Head of the Biceps

Various clinical tests, which should be a symptom of tendinitis of the long head of the biceps, are described i.e.. Yergasson sign. But their meaning for a determination of a diagnosis of tenovaginitis is debatable. The meaning of these maneuvers is rather in a telling of a possible suspicion of possible pathology of the long head of the biceps of any etiology (not only tendinitis, but also ruptures). But definitely they are not reliable enough. Without any doubts it is possible to claim that at the suspicion of pathology of the long head of the biceps resulting from clinical state (see clinical picture of bicipital tendinitis and tenovaginitis) is more suitable to make the ultrasound examination of the shoulder which is highly sensitive, especially in the area of the long head of the biceps than to make clinical tests.

 

 

Reasons for skepticism to clinical tests on the diagnostics of tendinitis of the long head of the biceps

In the area of the long head of the biceps there are other structures (for example, a rotator cuff and a subdeltoid bursa) which at their pathology  can evoke the same clinical problems because of their closeness to the long head of the biceps. Tenovaginitis can have various etiology. It is necessary to connect this diagnosis with an etiologic factor which evokes it for example, staphylococcal tenovaginitis, traumatic tenovaginitis after overloading, or tenovaginitis at rheumatoid arthritis etc. In this case the clinical tests have no meaning too.